Introduction

In all my life, I have never stayed more than three years at a single school, and never will. From kindergarten through my senior year of college, I will have earned credits from nine different institutions, and will do so by the time I’m twenty-one. I’m not a military brat, nor an exchange student, I’m just one of millions living with the consequences of having a slightly-less boring life than the average Centennial.

Being the New Kid is always rough, repetitive to the point where telling your new peers and teachers, “No, my name is spelled like this,” plays on a loop in your dreams. It’s the nausea that comes when the lunch bell rings and you realize you’ll have to sit alone in the corner and hope some kind-hearted mind-reader arrives to bail you out. It’s the maze of hallways and false advertisements that lead you to slaughter if you walk into the class that isn’t yours halfway through the foreign language lecture you can’t understand. It’s all the big issues and inconsequential nuances of being New, and it’s stagnant in its formula like a pre-algebra textbook.

But every place is different, and it’s those differences you have to focus on. That’s what making it as the New Kid is all about.

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4 thoughts on “Introduction

  1. Well being the new kid over and over can make you more worldly. Maybe in the future you can use those experiences to help you travel the world. I know something I’ve always wanted to do is visit every country.

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  2. Love your intro and I am looking forward to reading more of your blog. I too know what it’s like to be the new kid but that’s where I found my love for books.
    -Victoria

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  3. Being the new kid is definitely hard. I’ve been there a few times so I understand how you feel, though I haven’t been to as many new schools as you. If anything, I’m sure you’ll come out stronger from so much change.
    -Kim

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  4. Sounds like you are experiencing what some people might be envious of. While for you it has become a challenge to learn to “fit in”. I think we have all gone through times where we needed to learn to “fit in”. It’s somewhat comforting to know others face it also.

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